Sun protection 101
Sun protection 101

May 20th, 2019

2020-01-22T21:34:09.836Z

Apostrophe

There are two types of that block UV rays: chemical and physical. Chemical ingredients undergo a chemical reaction to convert UV rays into heat to prevent sun damage. Physical ingredients physically absorb UV rays to keep them from the skin and prevent sun damage. They are considered almost perfect sunscreens as they are chemically inert, safe, and protect against the full UV spectrum.


Chemical sunscreen

  • Avobenzone – Avobenzone is a It degrades quickly on its own when exposed to sunlight so it is often combined with photostabilizing ingredients that give it staying power in sunscreen. It does not protect against UVB rays.
  • Octinoxate – Octinoxate is a and absorbs UVB rays from the sun. It is often combined with nanoparticles and water-resistant ingredients to keep it localized to the skin and to prevent absorption.
  • Oxybenzone – Oxybenzone is a benzophenone derivative and absorbs from the sun to protect your skin.

  • Zinc oxide – Zinc oxide is a physical sunscreen that absorbs up to 360 nm of UV radiation and protects against both UVB and UVA rays.
  • Titanium dioxide – Titanium dioxide is a physical sunscreen that absorbs up to 400 nm of UV radiation and protects against both UVB and UVA rays.

With all these different sunscreen ingredients, and the overwhelming number of sunscreens on the market, you may be wondering what your best options are. Three of Apostrophe's board-certified dermatologists, Dr. Aimee Paik, Dr. George Skandamis, and Dr. Bradley Beckman, recommend Elta MD as their favorite facial SPF! Dr. Skandamis also recommends Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Sunscreen Spray for the body for everyday UV protection. If you’re heading to the beach, you may want to explore some reef-safe options to help protect our oceans! With all the great products out there, there’s never a reason to go without sun protection.

Welcome to the fine print! Just so you know, this article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice. It’s always best to talk to a doctor for that stuff.

Welcome to the fine print! Just so you know, this article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice. It’s always best to talk to a doctor for that stuff.

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