EYELASHES

Long, lush... eyebrows? Maybe – with Latisse.

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Long, lush... eyebrows? Maybe – with Latisse.
Long, lush... eyebrows? Maybe – with Latisse.

April 17th, 2019

2019-10-01T00:41:16.592Z

Apostrophe

By now, you know about Latisse – the prescription solution that makes your own lashes grow in longer, thicker, and darker. Latisse works by the growth cycle of your natural lash so those hairs have more time to grow, thereby getting longer and darker than they normally would. If it works on your lashes, could it work on your brows?

Looking for Cara Delevingne brows?

If you’ve ever overplucked, experienced a waxing mishap, or simply were born with thinner brows, you know how agonizing the process of growing in your brows can be. Brows also lose fullness and thickness as we age which can make the face look harsher or more drawn than we would like. Eyebrow products like pencils, gels, or powders can fake fuller, darker brows, but need to be reapplied every day and don’t always stay on through sweat or swimming. Eyebrow tattooing or microblading can be a more permanent option, but the cost can range from depending on where you live and who you go to (plus, needles can be a bit… 😬). Some people (including Victoria Beckham) are turning to Latisse instead.

Bold brows

shows that using Latisse on your brows can result in fuller, thicker brows. Researchers separated subjects into three groups and instructed them to apply bimatoprost 0.03% (the generic name for Latisse) either once or twice a day, and gave the third group a placebo. Overall, 70.3% of subjects in the group that applied the solution twice a day reported feeling “very satisfied” or “mostly satisfied” with the appearance of their brows after seven months. Researchers also concluded that the treatment was safe and well-tolerated and encourage into the use of bimatoprost on eyebrows. If you aren’t swayed by the numbers, take a look at the study we’ve linked – they included pictures ;)

Off-label uses 🤔

It’s important to note that using Latisse on your eyebrows is considered an “off-label use.” This means that the FDA has the drug to be used for that purpose, but physicians have used their judgement as medical professionals to prescribe it. Bimatoprost 0.03% was first approved to treat glaucoma when patients began noticing its effect on their eyelashes. A few years later, the FDA approved bimatoprost for eyelash growth as well. It’s important to use caution and to always follow the directions of your doctor when using prescriptions for off-label uses, but these medications can be important tools in caring for your health!

Latisse has the potential to take your brow game to the next level. Just be sure to ask you doctor about it before diving in!

Would you try Latisse on your brows? Have you already tried it? Let us know on Twitter at @hi_apostrophe!

Welcome to the fine print! Just so you know, this article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice. It’s always best to talk to a doctor for that stuff.

Prescription medication should only be used according to doctor's instructions. Do not use Latisse if you are allergic to one of its ingredients. Common side effects include itchy and red eyes. Full list of safety information can be found at: apostr.com/latisse.

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