SKIN

How pregnancy affects your skin

Back to blog

How pregnancy affects your skin
How pregnancy affects your skin

December 13th, 2019

2020-01-16T00:49:02.096Z

Apostrophe

People often say "you're glowing" to those who are pregnant, but not everyone experiences that famous pregnancy glow. There’s no question that pregnancy causes dramatic changes in your biology and while these changes can lead to rosy, glowing skin (a result of increased blood flow), they can also lead to a host of new skin challenges. But never fear! We are going to answer your questions about the most common skin issues pregnant people face right here.

Acne

Pregnancy means major Those hormone fluctuations can often cause acne. While it is possible for acne to clear during pregnancy, you may also find your acne worsens or you are dealing with new kinds of breakouts (everyone is different!). Estrogen steadily increases throughout a pregnancy (reaching its peak in the third trimester) while progesterone increases quickly and remains high. which can lead to an increase in your skin’s oil production. Oilier skin = more clogged pores = more blackheads and pimples! Although retinoids like tretinoin, and especially tazarotene, are a big no-no during pregnancy, our medical director, Dr. Aimee Paik, says, “Azelaic acid, topical antibiotics, and benzoyl peroxide are safe to use.” Be sure to ask your doctor about treatment if pregnancy acne has got you down!

Melasma

Pregnancy-related melasma, also known as the “pregnancy mask” or are areas of hyperpigmentation that appear on sun-exposed areas of the face, particularly on the upper cheeks, forehead, and/or upper lip areas. Being diligent about applying sunscreen during pregnancy can help prevent or decrease this phenomenon and you may find the melasma disappears on its own after pregnancy. If your pregnancy mask persists, researchers have shown topical tretinoin (like Apostrophe’s Tretinoin Formula 😉) to be effective in

Stretch marks

are fine lines that occur when tissue under the skin tears from rapid growth or overstretching. Any kind of speedy growth that causes tension on the skin has the potential to cause stretch marks (many of us get them during puberty as your skin races to catch up with your body during a growth spurt!). They are also extremely common during pregnancy as your body changes to accommodate a growing baby. Dr. Paik adds, “The development of stretch marks is largely determined by your genetics. They can be itchy, so moisturizers can help these symptoms.”

Rashes

or PUPPP, is one of the most common skin concerns during pregnancy. It typically occurs during the third trimester when small, red, and itchy bumps or hives can develop. They often start on the abdomen and spread to the thighs, breasts, arms, and butt. This may not be pleasant, but there’s hope! Apostrophe’s medical director suggests, “You can practice gentle skin care by avoiding very hot water when bathing, using gentle fragrance-free soaps, and minimizing bathing time. Moisturizers are also very important. You can also apply a rich, fragrance-free cream after bathing and more often as needed to help reduce skin irritation.”

Pregnancy can be both an exciting and challenging time. Your doctor is your most valuable and trusted resource during this time – use them! They will give you the medical advice that is best for you and make your pregnancy journey a little easier.

Do you have a great skin tip for pregnancy? Reach out on Twitter @hi_apostrophe or send an email to social@apostrophe.com!

Welcome to the fine print! Just so you know, this article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice. It’s always best to talk to a doctor for that stuff.

Prescription medication should only be used according to doctor's instructions. Do not use Tretinoin Formula if you are allergic to one of its ingredients. Common side effects include redness and peeling. Full list of safety information can be found at: apostr.com/side

Recommended Posts

We asked three dermatologists about skincare across race.
skin,sun protection,skin cancer,sunscreen,patient care,advice

2020-01-16T01:10:59.385Z

Apostrophe

We asked three dermatologists about skincare across race.

Read

Fact or fiction: CBD oil
skin,CBD,acne,lifestyle,ingredients,science

2020-01-16T00:59:37.975Z

Apostrophe

Fact or fiction: CBD oil

Read

Acids 101
skin,acids,skincare,science,ingredients,advice

2020-01-16T00:58:53.215Z

Apostrophe

Acids 101

Read

Still thinking about it? 💭

Sign up for our newsletter to get $10 off your Apostrophe medication. 🤑