Fact or fiction: water and acne
Fact or fiction: water and acne

March 7th, 2019

2020-01-22T21:33:45.824Z

Apostrophe

It feels like every time you open up social media there is a wellness guru or influencer telling you that drinking water is the key to staying healthy and glow-y. You know staying hydrated is important for your overall health, but can it keep your acne at bay?

The truth about water and acne

Like the earth, your body is about 70% water. Much of your water content is contained in bodily fluids like blood, lymph, and mucus. These fluids serve two critical functions in keeping your organs happy and healthy: 1) carrying vitamins and nutrients in, and 2) flushing toxins and waste products out. When you become dehydrated, your skin, your body’s largest organ, loses the fluid it needs to to carry waste and bacteria out which leaves your skin dry and congested.

Commit to the real deal

Don’t try to fake your fluid intake with soda, milk, or coffee. Other drinks won’t hydrate you the way good old H2O does, and drinks high in or may make acne worse. suggests aiming for approximately 11-15 cups a day. While that may sound like a lot, keeping a bottle of water on hand can help make hydrating a habit and make it easier to remember to drink. Your body will thank you!

Water isn’t a miracle cure

Despite its many benefits, drinking water is not a cure-all for acne. Our medical director, Dr. Aimee Paik, states, "The water you drink has no [direct] impact on your skin's hydration. It is important to not overstrip the skin by overwashing or using harsh soaps or scrubs. Moisturizers are also very important for the skin." For those with very mild acne, over-the-counter ingredients like benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid might be all you need. For those with moderate to severe acne, a prescription medication may be necessary, which can only be obtained through a dermatologist (like one from Apostrophe!).

Mom may have been right about drinking water to stay healthy, but it won't zap your zits. Don't let that stop you from staying hydrated, though! Drinking water works from the inside out to help you feel your best.

Welcome to the fine print! Just so you know, this article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice. It’s always best to talk to a doctor for that stuff.

Welcome to the fine print! Just so you know, this article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice. It’s always best to talk to a doctor for that stuff.

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